Mardi, octobre 21, 2014

(Source : bathcrone)

little-siksura:

ziusik:

GOD I LOVE THIS FUCKING SHOW

Insta-reblog.

(Source : pcaparty)

quicksandbuddy:

viviku:

gothfabio:

ricktimus:

Probably my favorite thing about Bob’s Burgers is that they don’t do that thing where the characters try to one-up each other with an endless barrage of jokes? No, the characters react like actual people instead. They actually laugh or chuckle when somebody says something actually funny and/or weird. They stop mid-sentence. They do double-takes. And it all feels so very natural, because that is exactly what common people do. And that is such a refreshing change of pace, when you consider the fact that the norm in these things is to have jokes relentlessly thrown at you at break-necking speed.

also the comedy doesn’t rely on the parents hating and berating eachother idk i love that

it shows how you don’t need to be offensive to be funny

general banter is the best way to write dialogue

I also like that he prefers his wife’s idea over a complement from his role model because he thinks it’s legitimately funny and clever. Most sitcom husbands belligerently disregard anything that comes out of their wife’s mouth, much less acknowledge when they’re being humorous.

shadowsfate:

Stumbled upon this on Facebook today and couldn’t stop laughing. 

shadowsfate:

Stumbled upon this on Facebook today and couldn’t stop laughing. 

comicsalliance:

GENE LUEN YANG TO COMIC CREATORS: DON’T LET FEAR STOP YOU FROM WRITING DIVERSE CHARACTERS
By Matt D. Wilson
In a speech at the National Book Festival at the Library of Congress last weekend, The Shadow Hero writer Gene Luen Yang threw down the gauntlet.
Yang challenged comics creators to overcome their fears of bring criticized for inaccurately portraying characters who are different from them — in terms of race, gender, or other identifying factors. In brief, he told writers to do some research and get it right, but first and foremost to step outside themselves.
Here’s a brief excerpt:

We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.
This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.
After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.

READ MORE

comicsalliance:

GENE LUEN YANG TO COMIC CREATORS: DON’T LET FEAR STOP YOU FROM WRITING DIVERSE CHARACTERS

By Matt D. Wilson

In a speech at the National Book Festival at the Library of Congress last weekend, The Shadow Hero writer Gene Luen Yang threw down the gauntlet.

Yang challenged comics creators to overcome their fears of bring criticized for inaccurately portraying characters who are different from them — in terms of race, gender, or other identifying factors. In brief, he told writers to do some research and get it right, but first and foremost to step outside themselves.

Here’s a brief excerpt:

We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.

This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.

After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.


READ MORE

karenhurley:

This campaign is great, really makes you look closer instead of just and quick stereotypical glance 

GSR Entrance Hall System

Advertising Agency: SPR Agency, Novo Hamburgo, Brazil Via

Though nearly 20 percent of Americans have physical or mental disabilities, studies show that less than 20 percent of medical schools teach their students how to talk with disabled patients about their needs.

More than half of medical school deans report that their students aren’t competent to treat people with disabilities, and a similar percentage of graduates agree. Accreditation and licensing boards don’t require clinicians to demonstrate knowledge or skills in treating patients with disabilities.

Doctors’ Ignorance Stands In The Way Of Care For The Disabled (via disabilityhistory)

Great article!

(via chronic-illness-support)

abled people who act like medical professionals are magical omniscient gods need to read this

(via marshmallowknight)

Because sometimes patients actually DO know better than doctors, despite some doctors refusal to admit it.

(via livingwithendo)

avatarskorra:

jinorasity:

The part where Aang’s theme quietly transitions into Korra’s still breaks me.  

(Source : metalclan)

visardist:

elidyce:

formerqueenregent:

"Yes," said Eustace, "and whenever you’ve tried to get her to come and talk about Narnia or do anything about Narnia, she says ‘What wonderful memories you have! Fancy you still thinking about all those funny games we used to play when we were children.’ "

"Oh Susan!" said Jill. "She’s interested in nothing nowadays except nylons and lipstick and invitations. She always was a jolly sight too keen on being grow-up."

"Grown-up, indeed," said the Lady Polly. "I wish she would grow up. She wasted all her school time wanting to be the age she is now, and she’ll waste all the rest of her life trying to stay that age. Her whole idea is to race on to the silliest time of one’s life as quick as she can and then stop there as long as she can."

"Well, let’s not talk about that now," said Peter.

       

The one I wanted to throttle was Polly. Lucy is possibly young enough not to really get it yet but Polly was a grown-ass woman and should have known better than to talk that kind of shit about a young woman wanting to stop being a child.

Susan wanted to grow up. She wanted (as mentioned in ‘The Horse And His Boy’) to fall in love and get married. She worried, she protected, she mothered. And she was the only one, the only one out of all of them, who got it right. Aslan told them they had to move on. To grow up. To find him in their own world. 

Susan was Aslan’s big fucking success. The others couldn’t do it. They couldn’t take the lessons they’d learned in Narnia into their own world. They couldn’t make a difference there - no, they all spent their time obsessing with getting back. Narnia was heaven for them and they couldn’t function anywhere else, so Aslan took them back one last time to suspend them forever in the only world they wanted.

Narnia was not Susan’s heaven. Narnia was not what Susan wanted. Eternal youth and innocence was not what Susan wanted. Susan wanted to grow. Susan wanted to grow up. Susan wanted love, and family, and her own world. Susan’s heaven was the one drawn from Earth, from a life lived to the full.

Since I was a kid, I have always thought of ‘The Last Battle’ as a very sad story because it is ultimately a story of failure. All the ‘kings and queens of Narnia’ die and are brought back to the dying magical world because they couldn’t accept what Aslan had told them over and over about growing up and moving on. They weren’t supposed to come back. It was a final act of mercy that Aslan allowed them to do so, since they couldn’t bear to live in their own world.

I think Susan would visit them someday, with her queen’s crown and her blazing red lipstick and the lines of growth and character on her face, and very gently explain to the perpetual children in Narnia that she was thankful that Aslan hadn’t taken her with the others. That she was thankful for her children and grandchildren, for boyfriends and husbands, for a life that was full and happy and productive. That she never needed Narnia to be happy. That she missed them, that she’d mourned for them, but she wouldn’t change her own choice for anything.

tamikaflynned, sting-like-jelly, takemeinyourdream idk who else follows me who’s narnia

(Source : tsarskoschei)